Friday, 6 October 2017

Biochemical individuality. Thoughts on the effectiveness of dichloroacetate as an anti-cancer agent from DNA testing and analysis

I have been using Prometheus to extract raw data from my 23andme raw data in an attempt to personalise my approaches moving forward. You can find out more here: https://promethease.com

https://www.britannica.com/science/DNA

Interestingly, following on from my post about DCA, I decided to determine what SNPs I had relating to specific nutrients, metabolic therapies, and drugs. I have explored this before, but not in as much depth as I have recently.

From pouring over the exhaustive amount of data detailed in my Prometheus report I found that I appear to be a slow metaboliser of DCA, which is interesting for a number of reasons.



DCA is an interesting chemical compound, because it can be a chlorine byproduct from chlorinating swimming pools and tap water, and the 'poison' could be in the dose, with some arguing that it may be a major environmental hazard, or a 'panacea for human ills'- This has not yet been proven definitively either way, as the study below has concluded, but perhaps never will be because it seems to be either helpful or harmful depending on the context. 


I came across this study when investigating if being a slow metaboliser could allow me to have greater harm from drinking chlorinated water, or, conversely, derive less potential benefit from treatment with DCA if I ever go down this route as a back up plan should I have a recurrence. In that case I may benefit more from intravenous DCA or I may not benefit significantly at all! Its interesting, harmful or helpful? Or both? Here is what I found...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3040600/

And my own personal conclusion? Well, I often say with these things that whenever we have seemingly extreme views, the truth often lies somewhere in between and this seems to be the case with DCA.



There is biochemical individuality with any drug, diet, or drug, whether it be 'natural' or synthetic. This is why I value genetic testing and a personalised approach to any treatment protocol. It is also why I chose to discontinue chemotherapy a few years ago not long after starting. It was a personal decision based on the fact that my tumour was not chemosensitive and I was unlikely to benefit from progression free survival. Even if you believe cancer is a metabolic disease, it is our genetics that can help us to determine what might potentially be the most beneficial approaches for us as individuals. You are as unique as your cancer and we are all different despite the many things we can have in common.

So with all this in mind, what is your view of DCA? Effective for some but not all? Personalised application and dosages? Breakthrough effective metabolic cancer treatment or major environmental hazard? The truth probably lies somewhere in between these two main ideas. 





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